Slaughterhouse 90210: Where Great Books Meet Pop Culture

by Maris Kreizman

The perfect book for anyone with a Netflix account and a library card.”Smart, sharp, and hilarious, Slaughterhouse 90210 is the perfect pick-me-up and never-put-me-down book.” – Jami Attenberg, bestselling author of The MiddlesteinsSlaughterhouse 90210 pairs literature’s greatest lines with pop culture’s best moments.In 2009, Maris Kreizman wanted to combine her fierce love for pop culture with a lifelong passion for reading, and so the blog Slaughterhouse 90210 wasborn.

  • Hardcover
  • Pages: 213 pages
  • Average Rating: 4.08 out of 5
  • Published October 6th 2015 by Flatiron Books
  • ISBN: 1250061105 (ISBN13: 9781250061102)
  • Edition Language: English

The perfect book for anyone with a Netflix account and a library card.”Smart, sharp, and hilarious, Slaughterhouse 90210 is the perfect pick-me-up and never-put-me-down book.” – Jami Attenberg, bestselling author of The MiddlesteinsSlaughterhouse 90210 pairs literature’s greatest lines with pop culture’s best moments.In 2009, Maris Kreizman wanted to combine her fierce love for pop culture with a lifelong passion for reading, and so the blog Slaughterhouse 90210 was born. By matching poignant passages from literature with popular moments from television, film, and real life, Maris’ work instantly caught the attention (and adoration) of thousands. And it’s easy to see why.Slaughterhouse 90210 is subversively brilliant, finding the depth in the shallows of reality television, and the levity in Lahiri. A picture of Taylor Swift is paired with Joan Didion’s quote, “Above all, she is the girl who ‘feels things’. The girl ever wounded, ever young.” Tony Soprano tenderly hugs his teenage son, accompanied by a line from Middlemarch about, “The patches of hardness and tenderness [that] lie side by side in men’s dispositions.” The images and quotes complement and deepen one another in surprising, profound, and tender ways.With over 150 color photographs from some of popular culture’s most iconic moments, Kreizman shows why comparing Walter White to Faust makes sense in our celebrity obsessed, tv crazed society.